Overview
Projects
Rating
Filtering
Views
Zooming
Close-ups
AI Assessments
Shot Information
Shipping to Lightroom

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Overview

Select, by Narrative, is a dedicated image selection tool. The broad aim of a selection tool is to help a photographer cull potentially thousands of RAW images from a photoshoot down to a few hundred as quickly as possible. We aid the selection process by rendering large image files very quickly and enhance the photographers powers by adding helpful features like close-ups and zoom to face.

Most photographers will scroll through their images, rating ones they want to keep, usually with 1 star (but there are many other ways to do this).

A full list of shortcut keys can be found here for you reference.

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Projects

Projects are the way to organise your work inside Select. The ‘Projects’ screen can be accessed by clicking on the purple Narrative icon in the toolbar.

For each new shoot, create a new project from the Projects screen, or click the small + icon at the top of the toolbar. Opened projects will sit in the toolbar.

Give the project a name, then pick the folder where the images for this project are stored. Select will then import all the image files found in that folder and any sub-folders in that folder.

You can delete a project from the Projects screen by clicking on the three dots on the right side of the project card. Deleting a project won’t delete either your image files or any ratings you applied.

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Rating

Applying a rating to an image is easy. Simply select the image you like by clicking on it, or using (←/→) keys to move between images. Now press the shortcut key for your desired rating. For example:

(1),(2),(3),(4) or (5) to apply a star rating and (6),(7),(8),(9) or (p) to apply a colour rating. This will show on the thumbnail and the bar below the image.

If you want to clear an image rating, press (0) or apply the same rating again. 

If your CAPS LOCK is activate you'll progress to the next image after applying a rating.

You can 'eliminate' an image with (x). This doesn't delete the image, but just hides it from your scrolling. This is a great way to help you whittle down a scene. To an eliminated image back, click on its thumbnail and press (x)

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Filtering

You can filter the images currently in view by clicking the rating icons in the toolbar. 

If you hold (⌘Command) and click on a filter you can quickly select every other filter except that filter. Useful if, for example, you want to hide any images you applied a red colour filter to.

The small number below each icon indicates how many images have that rating applied. 

The star with a little 0 indicates how many images have no star rating applied, and the grey circle with a line through it indicates how many images have no colour rating applied.

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Views

By default, you are in ‘Loupe View’ - which is where you see one main image and a filmstrip.

You can toggle the position of the filmstrip between vertical and horizontal by pressing (y)

To switch to ‘Grid View’, tap (g) or click the icon in the toolbar. 

From ‘Grid View’ switch back to ‘Loupe View’ by double-clicking on any thumbnail or by pressing spacebar. Alternatively, you can tap (e), or click the icon in the toolbar.

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Zooming

There are a few ways to zoom with Select. They all rely on the preset zoom level. This is set to 100% by default, which means that when you in zoom mode, you will see the image at 100% of its original size. We suggest you keep this as the default size as this will give you the truest representation of the image. If you want to change it, you can use the slider in the toolbar, or press (- / +)

Standard zoom

  • Press (z) to enter and exit zoom mode, or click the magnifying glass next to the slider in the toolbar. This will zoom you to your preset zoom level (100% by default). In zoom mode you can click and drag around the image.
  • We remember your last zoom position, so if you go to the next image and enter standard zoom mode you will zoom to the same point.

Zoom to face

  • Tap (spacebar). Again, this will zoom you to your preset zoom level, but if there are any faces detected in the image, you will be zoomed straight to the centre-most face.
  • Now you can press (↑ / ↓) to scroll between any faces found in the image.
  • If there are no face detected, pressing spacebar will act the same way a standard zoom (z).
  • PRO TIP – Hold (spacebar) and you'll temporarily zoom in until you release it. 

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Close-ups

Close-ups is the name of our zoom panel. You can use this in Loupe view.

Once turned on, by default, it shows all the key faces detected in the image. It’s great for checking if people have their eyes open and their faces are in focus in portrait, couples and group shots.

If no people are detected in the image we show a zoomed in portion of the centre of the image.

Open and close close-ups in split mode with ( / ) or ( . )

Open and close fullscreen mode with (⌘Command) + ( / ) or (⌘Command) + ( . )

If you click on a face – either in the main image or in the close-ups panel – it becomes ‘locked’. This means that that person will take over the entire close-ups panel. Press o to unlock them. When one face is locked you can also press up or down to scroll through any other faces in that image.

Similarly, if you click anywhere on the image, that area will become locked in the close-ups panel (and replace anything else that’s locked)

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Assessments

Switch assessments on and off with (⌘Command) + ( , ) or the icon in the toolbar.

Once you’ve got assessments mode switched on you’ll see small red or yellow indicators below some of your subject’s faces. These tell how well a subject’s face has been captured – red for really bad, and yellow for probably bad. Think of them as warning lights on your car’s dashboard. 

We use a combination of factors to decide which assessment indicator to apply. These include but are not limited to:

  • The degree to which the subject’s eyes are open or closed
  • How much they are in focus, relative to their size within the image
  • How prominent a subject is within an image relative to other subjects in the background (key people)
  • Relative differences between images within a scene.

We’re constantly updating our models and thresholds to make them as good as we can, but please feedback where you see anything that is incorrectly labelled.

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Shot information

If you want to see information about your shot, have a look at the shot info panel.

Open it with i or by tapping the tab in the lower right of your screen.

We’ve abbreviated the information shown by default, but you can click the ‘show more’ link to see all the shot information.

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Shipping to Lightroom

Once you’re happy with your selection it’s time to edit your images. Most photographers use Lightroom for this. So here’s how you get your selected images into Lightroom Classic:

Option 1. Select which images you want to edit and click the [SHIP] button. Pro tip: applying a filter or two can help you to easily grab just your selected images.
 

Option 2. Select which images you want to edit and drag them from the filmstrip over to the Lightroom app icon, or directly into the Lightroom window. You need to make sure that the import dialogue is not currently open in Lightroom.

Option 3. Inside Lightroom, import the folder where the images are saved. This will import all the images in the folder, so you’ll have to apply a filter to get your selection.

Learn more about safely syncing with Lightroom.

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